Global Statistics

All countries
548,935,393
Confirmed
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am
All countries
520,730,887
Recovered
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am
All countries
6,350,765
Deaths
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am

Coronavirus GLOBAL STATISTICS

All countries
548,935,393
Confirmed
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am
All countries
21,853,741
Active
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am
All countries
520,730,887
Recovered
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am
All countries
6,350,765
Deaths
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am

World’s Largest Climate Conference in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt

In November, the world’s largest climate conference will begin in one of the most rapidly warming regions. In about two weeks, world leaders, businessmen and, in theory, civil society organizations will hold talks on the Red Sea coast of Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. After the somewhat mixed results of last year’s COP 26 in Glasgow and an even more chilling IPCC report since then, global environmentalists are counting on this year’s COP 27 to deliver solutions that will change and reduce emissions. To develop measures that seriously threaten the climate.

Although on a global scale, this gathering is of great importance to the Egyptian hosts which also include diplomat accommodations for COP27 and journalists. As the first of two successive COPs in the Middle East and North Africa region, with COP 28 scheduled for the UAE, it could provide momentum to accelerate action against threats likely to affect the region. A recent paper by an EU agency makes clear how this part of the world is uniquely vulnerable and uniquely unprepared for climate change.

In addition, the Middle East region lags behind on climate, mainly due to the apathy of its top officials, which can be provided by the huge mega-platform needed to convince these men (and some women) at the COP of the need to act. Although climate and environment now feature prominently in most meetings related to the Middle East, they are often given cemeteries and conflicts to attract significant attention. Here, for the first time, is an opportunity to link climate action to broader economic and security priorities in the Middle East and North Africa region.

But for Egypt and environmental civil society in the wider region, this COP is arguably more important than the countries themselves. These organizations lack funding even though climate and environmental threats are ubiquitous, often denying willing or empowered government negotiators, and sometimes targeted by security agencies that have much of the decision-making power in the field. make a significant contribution. It could be argued that the crisis has deepened as a result of the marginalization of many of those better placed to cope. If the environmental community of the Middle East and North Africa region is to play a significant role in mitigating some of the worst climate impacts, this could be, and therefore probably is, the best option for the people of the region.

Activists and conservationists in the MENA region are fully aware of this, and many are calling for action. He has used the COP News links to run media campaigns and promote his profile – to good effect in various venues. From Tangier to Tehran, there are generally more journalists interested in the environment and more areas of environmental news. To be fair, some of this is superficial and, at least in Egypt, has largely been sunk from the pre-convention Cairo scene. State-owned newspapers and television channels continue to be flooded with news of plantation initiatives of dubious value.

The priorities of environmentalists in the Middle East and North Africa region closely align with those of countries in the region when it comes to lobbying for increased funding for adaptation in the region. Thus, this is one area where they hope to directly influence action. In Glasgow, representatives of the global south have raised their demand for funding for rich countries to compensate for “losses and damage” caused by extreme weather, and pressure on Egypt is likely to increase. But many countries lack both the capacity and expertise to secure or negotiate funding or full participation in the COP. Furthermore, by advocating on their behalf, Environmentalists in the Middle East and North Africa region are positioning themselves to advocate for climate-vulnerable communities as a whole.

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