Global Statistics

All countries
548,935,393
Confirmed
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am
All countries
520,730,887
Recovered
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am
All countries
6,350,765
Deaths
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am

Coronavirus GLOBAL STATISTICS

All countries
548,935,393
Confirmed
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am
All countries
21,853,741
Active
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am
All countries
520,730,887
Recovered
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am
All countries
6,350,765
Deaths
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am

Higher education and language skills also reduce the risk of dementia, research says

Canadian scientists have found that people with higher education as well as special skills in a language have a lower risk of dementia.

It should be noted that another similar study last year found that people who start studying at an early age and grow up to pursue complex skills have a lower risk of dementia than others.

Read more: Education and professional skills can also reduce the risk of dementia, research says
The new study, led by Professor Dr. Suzanne Tias at the University of Waterloo, Canada, uses information from a long and extensive study called “Nun Study”, which began. Happened in 1986.

The research study involved 678 female nuns from the School Sisters of Notre Dame who were at least 75 years old (at the beginning of the study). (By 2017, only three of these sisters survived.)

Dr. Suzanne and her colleagues examined the medical information of 472 sisters participating in the Nunn Study who had a pre-dementia symptom called MCI. Memory and learning ability were affected.

A search of data about their health for almost 9 years later revealed that dementia did not go beyond its initial symptoms in the majority (approximately 84%) of the sisters who were highly educated and had mastered complex English grammar. End However, more than 30% of the sisters’ memory and learning abilities soon returned to normal.

In contrast, the sisters, who were not well-educated and had a very good level of language skills, developed dementia a few years later.

The research, published in the latest issue of the research journal “Neurology”, shows that truly highly educated and diligently learned skills are not only better for us materially, but also for our brains. It also strengthens and protects against many mental and emotional illnesses.

1Z0-1046-21
1Y0-403
Sharing-and-Visibility-Designer
MS-101
MB-210
AZ-400
C_ARSOR_2108
NSE7_EFW-6.4
NSE4_FGT-6.4
C_HANATEC_17
CISSP
NCP-MCI-5.15

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