Global Statistics

All countries
682,664,563
Confirmed
Updated on March 21, 2023 7:39 pm
All countries
636,646,281
Recovered
Updated on March 21, 2023 7:39 pm
All countries
6,820,879
Deaths
Updated on March 21, 2023 7:39 pm

Coronavirus GLOBAL STATISTICS

All countries
682,664,563
Confirmed
Updated on March 21, 2023 7:39 pm
All countries
39,197,403
Active
Updated on March 21, 2023 7:39 pm
All countries
636,646,281
Recovered
Updated on March 21, 2023 7:39 pm
All countries
6,820,879
Deaths
Updated on March 21, 2023 7:39 pm

Melting is increasing under the Greenland ice sheets

New research suggests that Greenland’s ice sheets are melting faster from the bottom up, and that the accumulation of water there could accelerate the melting of the entire ice sheet and raise global sea levels.

The total area of ​​Greenland’s ice sheets is 50,000 square kilometers, but its depth is still not known and that is why it was not modeled and mapped.

Now Paul Christopherson of Cambridge University and his colleagues have devised a way to determine the melting of Greenland’s ice roots. It is also the second largest ice sheet in the world. Scientists have dug fourteen millimeters to find out its depth and condition with the help of laser.
Paul found that the water flowing just below each vertical gap was 100 times faster than the old estimate and had a speed faster than direct sunny ice. There are two reasons for this, firstly, the water from above is accumulating at the bottom, warming up and melting more ice, and secondly, the ice is also melting by gravity.

It turned out that Iceland’s ice sheet was melting from below. According to experts, the melting of Iceland’s ice could raise the level of global oceans and its melting is playing the most important role. Under the same model, the melting speed of ice can be just as fast wherever there are ice layers like Iceland.

Experts have expressed concern over this and warned of rising sea levels.

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