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Coronavirus GLOBAL STATISTICS

All countries
548,935,393
Confirmed
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am
All countries
21,853,741
Active
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am
All countries
520,730,887
Recovered
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am
All countries
6,350,765
Deaths
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am

Thousands of years ago, ‘war donkeys’ were used instead of horses

A global team of archaeologists has discovered that about 4,500 years ago, in Mesopotamia (present-day southern Iraq and northern Syria), animals made from a combination of domestic donkeys and wild mules were used for combat purposes. It can be said.

These were probably the first cross-bred animals to be bred by humans. Horses were used in wars 500 years later.

Research on symbolic images, animal skeletons and other documents found on ancient plaques from Mesopotamia revealed that they were called ‘Kunga’ and were used to pull chariots (two-wheeled warships) in battle. Used to go
Other archeological evidence suggests that the Kunga were very powerful and capable of running fast.

However, when the experts analyzed the bones of Kanga, they were disturbed because these animals were bigger in size than the ancient donkeys and wild mules but smaller than the horses.

If it wasn’t a horse, a donkey, or a wild mule, then what kind of animal was Kunga?

This confusion has been going on for many years and has been solved by a team of experts from the United States, France, Germany and China through genetic analysis.

For research, they obtained samples of the last Syrian mule tissue genes. The mule, which is only 3 feet tall, was kept in a zoo in Austria and died in 1927. But his body was carefully preserved and kept in Austria.

They also isolated the genes of an 11,000-year-old wild mule found in a region called Goibekli Tep in southeastern Turkey, which was in perfect condition.

A comparison of the genomes of the two animals revealed that the wild mule evolved rapidly and became smaller.

However, when compared to the Kunga of Mesopotamia, it became clear that the Kunga resembled both of them as well as donkeys.

In the light of this analysis, experts have concluded that ‘Kunga’ was actually made by combining wild mules and local donkeys from Mesopotamia.

In addition to being larger in size than normal donkeys and wild mules, they were also powerful and fast, but because of their hybrids, they could not breed.

Ancient Mesopotamian documents also describe the kunga as a very valuable and ‘rewarding’ animal, indicating that its birth was a difficult task.

For this, male wild mules were caught, which were matched with donkeys to produce ‘kunga’.

The skeletons of the Kunga found in Mesopotamia show certain markings on teeth and bones. They were covered with armor-like shells all over their bodies, while they were fed certain foods for strength and speed.

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