Global Statistics

All countries
548,935,393
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Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am
All countries
520,730,887
Recovered
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am
All countries
6,350,765
Deaths
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am

Coronavirus GLOBAL STATISTICS

All countries
548,935,393
Confirmed
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am
All countries
21,853,741
Active
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am
All countries
520,730,887
Recovered
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am
All countries
6,350,765
Deaths
Updated on June 27, 2022 1:19 am

Now even drones have become ‘nosy’

Spanish experts have developed a sensitive electronic nose that is as talented as the human nose. By using it on drones, the data can be obtained by smelling the reservoirs of polluted water.

According to a report published in the journal Eye Science, the nose can smell different odors, inform of their chemical composition and also provide information about their intensity and quantity. In this way polluted water of any plant, density of swimming pool and condition of drains can be ascertained.

In European countries, humans are currently working to sniff out contaminated water. While this is a good method, it is slow, expensive, and difficult to access. This can make it difficult to find the source of the odor.
Sometimes the smell of contaminated and chemically mixed water is so strong that the life of the people around becomes indigestible. That is why there has always been a need for faster and more efficient methods for wastewater management. Now scientists at the Bioengineering Institute in Catalonia, Santiago Marco and his colleagues have created an artificial nose that also uses artificial intelligence and collects data.

First, they used air-filled bags that were filled from the top of the sewage reservoir. Then they were trained by listening to the artificial nose. Thanks to artificial intelligence, the drone quickly began to detect odors and other details. Now this nasal drone can easily smell hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, sulfur dioxide, and other chemical odors. It can also detect bacteria and detect carbon dioxide.

In the next phase, a sologram-weighted nose was placed on a drone and tested at a wastewater plant from January to June. The drone sniffed through a 10-meter-long tube and inhaled air into a chamber. When its analysis came out, 10 out of 13 results of the artificial nose came out on the same standard as the human nose and it was also human confirmed. The drone’s movements also make it possible to predict which odor may increase at what time.

Following this success, work will be done to make the nose drone even better and lighter.

JN0-250
AD5-E803
1Z0-1078-21
1Z0-1076-21
1Z0-1070-21
NS0-520
MS-720
ACP-Cloud1
JN0-450
C1000-055

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